Indoor Conservation


Using water more efficiently will not only save money but, more importantly, will also help protect the quality of life of future Texans.

With the vastness of Texas, it’s easy to forget two important facts about our state: we are subject to frequent droughts, and our population is projected to double in the next 50 years. The cost of developing new or additional supplies in that same time period is estimated to be $30.7 billion.

To ensure that we have enough water for current and future Texans, we need to reduce the amount of water we waste.

Possible Water Savings

  • High-efficiency toilets, water-efficient washing machines, rainwater harvesting systems, and water-efficient landscaping can all help reduce water use.
  • Water-efficient showerheads and aerators for faucets can significantly reduce the amount of water you use. In fact, installing a water-efficient showerhead is one of the most effective water-saving steps you can take inside your house.
  • Leaking faucets and toilets can waste thousands of gallons of water monthly, and they are inexpensive to fix. A few small changes in your water use habits can make a huge difference in water savings.

Tips in the Bathroom

  • Replace your showerhead with a water-efficient model.
  • Take short showers.
  • Turn off the water while you are shaving. Fill the sink with hot water instead of letting the water run continuously.
  • Never use the toilet to dispose of trash.
  • Don’t waste water when brushing your teeth or washing your hands. Shut off the water until it’s time to rinse.

Tips in the Kitchen

  • Run the dishwasher only when full.
  • Install faucet aerators. You’ll never notice the difference, and you’ll cut your sink water consumption in half!
  • Keep a container of water in the refrigerator. It will be refreshingly cool and won’t waste water.
  • Dry scrape dishes instead of rinsing. Your dishwasher will take care of the rest.
  • Use garbage disposals sparingly. They can waste water unnecessarily.

Tips in the Kitchen

  • Conventional washing machines use 32 to 59 gallons of water per load. Use the lowest water level setting on the washing machine for light or partial loads whenever possible.
  • Use cold water as often as possible to save energy and conserve hot water for uses that cold water cannot serve.